The Niu Group

research

Research

Carbohydrates play key roles in essentially all physiological and pathological processes. Not surprisingly, the investigation of carbohydrates has served as the most fruitful platform for understanding key biological processes and developing novel pharmaceuticals. However, the tremendous challenges associated with the procurement, identification, and structural manipulation of carbohydrates have hampered the exploration of this fundamental class of compounds. Our group attempts to address some of the most prominent challenges in the area of glycoscience by developing new reactions, new reagents, and new catalysts.




1. Site-selective modification of glycosides

Rapid accesses to analogues and derivatives of glycosides offer tremendous opportunities to explore and exploit the properties of these compounds. However, many glycosides contain many hydroxyls that are similar in reactivities. It remains a significant challenge to differentiate these hydroxyls by chemical methods. Our group is interested in the development of methods to selectively modify certain hydroxyls of these complex molecules. Some of the examples can be seen in our recent paper published in ACIE, Chem, and summarized in Carbohydr. Res. More results in this field are coming soon.

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2. Synthesis of C-glycosides

C-glycosides are often explores as analogues of O-glycosides, but are more stable toward enzymatic hydrolysis than the latter. Our group is interested in the development of general and user-friendly methods to prepare this class of carbohydrate derivatives. Some of the examples can be seen in our recent paper published in JACS. More results in this field are coming soon.

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3. Synthesis of complex glycoconjugates

Some glycoconjugates are structurally very complex. Methods that are highly functional group tolerant prove effective to synthesize this products but remain rare. Our group is also interested in the development of such methods that are ultimately used in the construction of complex glycoconjugates. Some of the early results are published in ACIE.

research